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Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2018 Jun 6. pii: S0169-409X(18)30132-7. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2018.06.001. [Epub ahead of print]

Progress, obstacles, and limitations in the use of stem cells in organ-on-a-chip models.

Author information

1
Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford, CA 94305, United States; Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University Schools of Engineering and Medicine, Stanford, CA 943055, United States.
2
Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford, CA 94305, United States.
3
Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford, CA 94305, United States; Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, United States; Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, United States. Electronic address: joewu@stanford.edu.

Abstract

In recent years, drug development costs have soared, primarily due to the failure of preclinical animal and cell culture models, which do not directly translate to human physiology. Organ-on-a-chip (OOC) is a burgeoning technology with the potential to revolutionize disease modeling, drug discovery, and toxicology research by strengthening the relevance of culture-based models while reducing costly animal studies. Although OOC models can incorporate a variety of tissue sources, the most robust and relevant OOC models going forward will include stem cells. In this review, we will highlight the benefits of stem cells as a tissue source while considering current limitations to their complete and effective implementation into OOC models.

KEYWORDS:

3D culture; Cell culture; Differentiation; Embryonic stem cells; Induced pluripotent stem cells; Microfluidics; Organ-on-a-chip

PMID:
29885330
PMCID:
PMC6281815
[Available on 2019-12-06]
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2018.06.001

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