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Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2018 Aug;14(8):488-498. doi: 10.1038/s41584-018-0025-5.

Cannabinoids for the treatment of rheumatic diseases - where do we stand?

Author information

1
Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
2
Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.
3
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
4
Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, School of Nutritional Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel.
5
Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. shoenfel@post.tau.ac.il.
6
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. shoenfel@post.tau.ac.il.

Abstract

As medical use of cannabis is increasingly legalized worldwide, a better understanding of the medical and hazardous effects of this drug is imperative. The pain associated with rheumatic diseases is considered a prevalent indication for medicinal cannabis in various countries. Thus far, preliminary clinical trials have explored the effects of cannabis on rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and fibromyalgia; preliminary evidence has also found an association between the cannabinoid system and other rheumatic conditions, including systemic sclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The potential medicinal effects of cannabis could be attributable to its influence on the immune system, as it exerts an immunomodulatory effect on various immune cells, including T cells, B cells and macrophages. However, the available evidence is not yet sufficient to support the recommendation of cannabinoid treatment for rheumatic diseases.

PMID:
29884803
DOI:
10.1038/s41584-018-0025-5

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