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Sci Rep. 2018 Jun 8;8(1):8756. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-27134-5.

Skin Microbiota in Obese Women at Risk for Surgical Site Infection After Cesarean Delivery.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, USA. kara.rood@osumc.edu.
2
Center for Perinatal Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, 43215, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, USA.
4
Center for Microbial Pathogenesis, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, 43215, USA.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, USA.
6
Battelle Center for Mathematical Medicine, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, 43215, USA.

Abstract

The obesity pandemic in the obstetrical population plus increased frequency of Cesarean delivery (CD) has increased vulnerability to surgical site infection (SSI). Here we characterized the microbiome at the site of skin incision before and after CD. Skin and relevant surgical sites were sampled before and after surgical antisepsis from obese (n = 31) and non-obese (n = 27) pregnant women. We quantified bacterial biomass by qPCR, microbial community composition by 16sRNA sequencing, assigned operational taxonomic units, and stained skin biopsies from incision for bacteria and biofilms. In obese women, incision site harbors significantly higher bacterial biomass of lower diversity. Phylum Firmicutes predominated over Actinobacteria, with phylotypes Clostridales and Bacteroidales over commensal Staphylococcus and Propionbacterium spp. Skin dysbiosis increased post-surgical prep and at end of surgery. Biofilms were identified post-prep in the majority (73%) of skin biopsies. At end of surgery, incision had significant gains in bacterial DNA and diversity, and obese women shared more genera with vagina and surgeon's glove in CD. Our findings suggest microbiota at incision differs between obese and non-obese pregnant women, and changes throughout CD. An interaction between vaginal and cutaneous dysbiosis at the incision site may explain the a priori increased risk for SSI among obese pregnant women.

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