Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2018 May 30;13:1793-1801. doi: 10.2147/COPD.S153821. eCollection 2018.

Chronic cough as a novel phenotype of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Ilsan, Republic of Korea.
2
Division of Allergy and Respiratory Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Soon Chun Hyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Gachon University, Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Republic of Korea.
4
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Internal Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Yeouido St Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
7
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
8
Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea.
9
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Background and purpose:

Chronic cough can be a dominant symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although its clinical impact remains unclear. The aim of our study was to identify phenotypic differences according to the presence of chronic cough or sputum and evaluate the impact of chronic cough on the risk of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD).

Methods:

In a nationwide COPD cohort including 1,613 COPD patients, patients with chronic cough only, those with sputum only, those with chronic bronchitis (CB), and those without cough and sputum were compared with regard to dyspnea, lung function, quality of life (QoL), and risk of AECOPD.

Results:

The rates of chronic cough, chronic sputum, and both were 23.4%, 32.4%, and 18.2%, respectively. Compared with patients without chronic cough, those with chronic cough exhibited a lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second (% predicted) and diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (% predicted), more frequent AECOPD, more severe dyspnea, and worse QoL. Pulmonary function, dyspnea severity, and QoL worsened in the following order: without cough or sputum, with sputum only, with cough only, and with CB. Multivariate analyses revealed chronic cough as an independent risk factor for a lower lung function, more severe dyspnea, and a poor QoL. Moreover, the risk of future AECOPD was significantly associated with chronic cough (odds ratio 1.56, 95% CI 1.08-2.24), but not with chronic sputum.

Conclusion:

Our results suggest that chronic cough should be considered as an important phenotype during the determination of high-risk groups of COPD patients.

KEYWORDS:

chronic obstructive; cough; exacerbation; pulmonary disease; severity

PMID:
29881269
PMCID:
PMC5985853
DOI:
10.2147/COPD.S153821
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Dove Medical Press Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center