Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Appetite. 2018 Sep 1;128:233-241. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2018.05.149. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

The effect of sugar-sweetened beverage front-of-pack labels on drink selection, health knowledge and awareness: An online randomised controlled trial.

Author information

1
Deakin University, Global Obesity Centre, Institute for Healthcare Transformation, School of Health and Social Development, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia; Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food, Be Active Sleep Eat (BASE) Facility, School of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Notting Hill, VIC 3168, Australia.
2
Deakin University, Global Obesity Centre, Institute for Healthcare Transformation, School of Health and Social Development, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia.
3
Centre for Population Health, NSW Ministry of Health, North Sydney, NSW 2060, Australia.
4
NSW Office of Preventive Health, Ministry of Health, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia.
5
Deakin University, Global Obesity Centre, Institute for Healthcare Transformation, School of Health and Social Development, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia. Electronic address: anna.peeters@deakin.edu.au.

Abstract

PURPOSE AND AIM:

Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) provide little nutritional value and are associated with an increased risk of diet-related diseases. Despite this, SSB consumption is high globally. One emerging strategy aimed at reducing SSB consumption involves the use of front-of-pack (FOP) labels that clearly identify the risks associated with SSB consumption. The aim of this research study was to determine whether FOP labels with a graphic warning, text warning, sugar information (with the number of teaspoons of added sugar) or Health Star Rating (HSR) reduces intended choice of a SSB in an online choice experiment with young Australian adults.

RESULTS:

994 participants were recruited and completed the online choice experiment. Compared to the control group who were not exposed to a label, the graphic warning, text warning, sugar information and HSR labels all significantly reduced selection of a SSB in the choice scenario. The magnitude of effect was greatest for the graphic warning label (OR 0.22 95% CI 0.14-0.35). Compared to the control group, only the HSR label significantly increased selections of the high HSR drinks (OR 2.18 95% CI 1.20-3.97).

CONCLUSIONS:

FOP labels, particularly those with graphic warnings, have the potential to reduce intended SSB purchases. Labels that also identify healthier alternatives may influence consumers to substitute SSBs with healthier drinks.

KEYWORDS:

Label; Obesity; Sugar-sweetened beverage; Young adult

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center