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Biomark Med. 2018 Jun;12(6):583-596. doi: 10.2217/bmm-2017-0336. Epub 2018 Jun 6.

The validity, stability, and utility of measuring uric acid in saliva.

Author information

1
Institute for Interdisciplinary Salivary Bioscience Research, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697, USA.
2
T. Denny Sanford School of Social & Family Dynamics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA.
3
Research & Technology Center, Salimetrics, Carlsbad, CA 92008, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA.
5
Department of Population, Family, & Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
6
Department of Acute & Chronic Care, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
8
Salivary Bioscience Laboratory & Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

Serum uric acid (UA) is associated with many health conditions, including kidney, cardiovascular, and metabolic disorders. We examined the validity and stability of salivary UA as a noninvasive measure of serum UA.

MATERIALS & METHODS:

Using serum and salivary UA data from healthy adults (n = 99), we examined the UA serum-saliva correlation, and UA associations with adiponectin and C-reactive protein. Using longitudinal data from young adults (n = 182), we examined salivary UA stability.

RESULTS:

We found robust positive serum-saliva correlations for UA. UA and adiponectin were inversely related in serum and saliva. Salivary UA was relatively stable; 62-66% of variance could be attributed to a latent trait-like component.

CONCLUSION:

Salivary UA may be an important biomarker indexing health and disease risk.

KEYWORDS:

C-reactive protein; adiponectin; biomarker; body mass index; latent state-trait modeling; saliva; serum; uric acid

PMID:
29873515
DOI:
10.2217/bmm-2017-0336

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