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Crit Care. 2018 Jun 5;22(1):150. doi: 10.1186/s13054-018-2060-7.

Prognostication after cardiac arrest.

Author information

1
Istituto Anestesiologia e Rianimazione Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "Agostino Gemelli, Largo Francesco Vito 1, 00168, Rome, Italy. claudio.sandroni@policlinicogemelli.it.
2
Istituto Anestesiologia e Rianimazione Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Fondazione Policlinico Universitario "Agostino Gemelli, Largo Francesco Vito 1, 00168, Rome, Italy.
3
School of Clinical Science, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
4
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK.

Abstract

Hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury (HIBI) is the main cause of death in patients who are comatose after resuscitation from cardiac arrest. A poor neurological outcome-defined as death from neurological cause, persistent vegetative state, or severe neurological disability-can be predicted in these patients by assessing the severity of HIBI. The most commonly used indicators of severe HIBI include bilateral absence of corneal and pupillary reflexes, bilateral absence of N2O waves of short-latency somatosensory evoked potentials, high blood concentrations of neuron specific enolase, unfavourable patterns on electroencephalogram, and signs of diffuse HIBI on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Current guidelines recommend performing prognostication no earlier than 72 h after return of spontaneous circulation in all comatose patients with an absent or extensor motor response to pain, after having excluded confounders such as residual sedation that may interfere with clinical examination. A multimodal approach combining multiple prognostication tests is recommended so that the risk of a falsely pessimistic prediction is minimised.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac arrest; Coma; Hypoxic brain damage; Prognosis

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