Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurodegener Dis. 2018;18(2-3):127-132. doi: 10.1159/000489311. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Association between White Matter Lesions and Non-Motor Symptoms in Parkinson Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Seoul, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Neurology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Neurology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, College of Medicine, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Biostatistics, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Seoul, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are only few studies exploring the relationship between white matter lesions (WMLs) and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson disease (PD). This study aimed to investigate the association between WMLs and the severity of non-motor symptoms in PD.

METHODS:

The severity of motor dysfunction, cognitive impairment, and non-motor symptoms was assessed by various scales in 105 PD patients. We used a visual semiquantitative rating scale and divided the subjects into four groups: no, mild, moderate, and severe WMLs. We compared the means of all scores between the four groups and analyzed the association between the severity of WMLs and the specific domain of non-motor symptoms.

RESULTS:

The non-motor symptoms as assessed by the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), and Parkinson Fatigue Scale (PFS) were significantly worse in the patients with moderate and severe WMLs than in those without WMLs. Compared with the no WML group, the scores for motor dysfunction were significantly higher in the mild, moderate, and severe WML groups. The scores for cognitive dysfunction were significantly higher in the patients with severe WMLs than in those without WMLs. The severity of WMLs showed linear associations with PFS, BDI, BAI, NPI, and PDQ-39 scores. The severity of WMLs also correlated linearly with scores for motor and cognitive dysfunction.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among the non-motor symptoms, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and quality of life were significantly affected by WMLs in PD. Confirmation of the possible role of WMLs in non-motor symptoms associated with PD in a prospective manner may be crucial not only for understanding non-motor symptoms but also for the development of treatment strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Fatigue; Non-motor symptoms; Parkinson disease; White matter lesion

PMID:
29870975
DOI:
10.1159/000489311
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for S. Karger AG, Basel, Switzerland
Loading ...
Support Center