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Clin Genitourin Cancer. 2018 Aug;16(4):313-317. doi: 10.1016/j.clgc.2018.05.007. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Association Between Androgen Deprivation Therapy and Patient-reported Depression in Men With Recurrent Prostate Cancer.

Author information

1
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
2
Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
4
South Carolina College of Pharmacy and Hollings Cancer Center, Columbia, SC.
5
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.
6
Department of Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA; Department of Urology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA.
7
Merck Pharmaceuticals, Kenilworth, NJ.
8
Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. Electronic address: pnguyen@LROC.harvard.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous studies have reported conflicting results on the relationship between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and the risk of depression. We assessed whether ADT is associated with depression in a unique data set of men with recurrent prostate cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We studied a cohort of 656 men in the prospective COMPARE (Comprehensive, Multicenter, Prostate Adenocarcinoma) registry who experienced biochemical recurrence after radiation therapy (RT) only, radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without RT, or ADT with RP or RT. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between the modality of treatment and patient-reported depression.

RESULTS:

Of 656 men, 44 (6.7%) experienced depression. The prevalence of depression stratified by treatment was 3.2% for RT only, 5.9% for RP with or without RT, and 9.1% for ADT plus RP or RT. Compared with RT-only, ADT plus RP or RT was associated with a significantly increased rate of depression (P = .031) and RP with or without RT was not (P = .195). On multivariate analysis adjusting for age and baseline comorbidities, the receipt of ADT was associated with an increased risk of depression (odds ratio, 3.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-9.76; P = .032) compared with RT only. No statistically significant difference was found in the risk of depression for men who received RP with or without RT versus RT only (odds ratio, 2.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-6.65; P = .19).

CONCLUSION:

Men with recurrent prostate cancer who underwent ADT were 3 times more likely to report experiencing depression. Treating physicians should discuss depression as a possible side effect when considering the use of ADT and should screen for depression in men who have received ADT.

KEYWORDS:

ADT; Radiation therapy; Radical prostatectomy; Systemic therapy; Toxicity

PMID:
29866496
DOI:
10.1016/j.clgc.2018.05.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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