Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Urol. 2018 Jun 5;18(1):56. doi: 10.1186/s12894-018-0371-2.

Knowledge and attitude for overactive bladder care among women: development and measurement.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3535 Market St., Suite 4051, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. rasu@mail.med.upenn.edu.
2
Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
4
Departments of Medicine and Health Management, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine and Wharton School of Business, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.
5
Departments of Medicine and Surgery, Divisions of Geriatrics and Urology, Perelman School of Medicine Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Overactive bladder (OAB) affects millions of women. It is important to assess knowledge and attitude in affected patients. The study objective was to develop surveys to assess OAB knowledge and OAB related attitude, and its association with OAB treatment status.

METHODS:

Systematic literature review and qualitative analysis of patient and provider focus groups helped identify OAB knowledge and attitude survey items. We determined psychometric properties of the two surveys in a cross-sectional sample of 104 women, 27% of whom had received OAB treatment.

RESULTS:

The OAB-knowledge survey consisted of 16 items and 3 condition-related concepts: perception of OAB; cause and information; and signs of OAB. The OAB-attitude survey consisted of 16 items and its concepts were treatment seeking; decision-making and effects. Both surveys demonstrated good construct validity and test-retest reliability ((≥ 0.60). In the cross-sectional validation sample, OAB-knowledge and attitude discriminated between those with different levels of ICIQ-UI scores. We observed some difference in the OAB knowledge, OAB attitude, and severity of symptoms between those treated for OAB vs. treatment naive.

CONCLUSIONS:

OAB knowledge and attitude surveys provide a novel tool to assess OAB domains in women. Though we did not find statistical significance in OAB knowledge and attitude scores across treatment status, they may be potentially modifiable factors that affect OAB treatment uptake and treatment compliance. Refinement of these surveys in diverse sub-populations is necessary. Our study provides effect sizes for OAB knowledge and attitude. These effect sizes can help development of fully powered trials to study the association between OAB knowledge and attitude, type and length of treatment, treatment compliance, and quality of life, leading to interventions for enhancing OAB care.

KEYWORDS:

Knowledge and attitude; Overactive bladder; Treatment uptake; Women

PMID:
29866095
PMCID:
PMC5987448
DOI:
10.1186/s12894-018-0371-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center