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Biomed Pharmacother. 2018 Jul;103:1557-1566. doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2018.04.198. Epub 2018 May 7.

Biochemical and computational evaluation of Triptolide-induced cytotoxicity against NSCLC.

Author information

1
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China.
2
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China; Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, China Pharmaceutical University, Ministry of Education, Nanjing, China.
3
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China; Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan.
4
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China; Jiangsu Center for Pharmacodynamics Research and Evaluation, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China; Center for Drug Screening and Pharmacodynamics Evaluation, School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510006, China. Electronic address: lyzhang@cpu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Triptolide is the major bioactive component isolated from the Chinese Medicinal plant Tripterygium wilfordii. Despite the growing interest and the plethora of reports discussing the pharmacological activity of this diterpenoid, no clear consensus regarding its cellular targets and full mechanism of action has been reached. In the present work, a combined in vitro and in silico approach was used to evaluate the biological activity of Triptolide on Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In vitro, Triptolide treatment induced apoptosis in NSCLC cell lines and down-regulated the phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR, and p70S6K. Triptolide also impacted cellular glycolysis as well as the antioxidant response through the impairment of glucose utilization, HKII, glutathione, and NRF2 levels. Molecular docking results examined the possible interactions between Triptolide and AKT and predicted an allosteric binding to AKT-1 structure. Molecular dynamics simulations were further used to evaluate the stability of the complex formed by Triptolide's best conformer and AKT. These findings provide an insightful approach to the anticancer effect of Triptolide against NSCLC and highlight a possible new role for AKT/mTOR HKII inhibition.

KEYWORDS:

AKT; Molecular docking; Non-small cell lung cancer; Triptolide

PMID:
29864943
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopha.2018.04.198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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