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J Dent. 2018 Aug;75:91-97. doi: 10.1016/j.jdent.2018.05.023. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

In-vitro transdentinal diffusion of monomers from adhesives.

Author information

1
KU Leuven BIOMAT, Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Leuven & Dentistry University Hospitals Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
2
Environment and Health, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Kapucijnenvoer 35, 3000 Leuven, Belgium.
3
Environment and Health, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Kapucijnenvoer 35, 3000 Leuven, Belgium; IDEWE, External Service for Prevention and Protection at Work, 3001 Heverlee, Belgium.
4
KU Leuven BIOMAT, Department of Oral Health Sciences, University of Leuven & Dentistry University Hospitals Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: kirsten.vanlanduyt@med.kuleuven.be.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Biocompatibility of adhesives is important since adhesives may be applied on dentin near the pulp. Accurate knowledge of the quantity of monomers reaching the pulp is important to determine potential side effects. The aim of this study was to assess the transdentinal diffusion of residual monomers from dental adhesive systems using an in-vitro pulp chamber model.

METHODS:

Dentin disks with a thickness of 300 μm were produced from human third molars. These disks were fixed between two open glass tubes, representing an in-vitro pulp chamber. The etch-and-rinse adhesive OptiBond FL and the self-etch adhesive Clearfil SE Bond were applied to the dentin side of the disks, while on in the pulpal side, the glass tube was filled with 600 μl water. The transdentinal diffusion of different monomers was quantified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

RESULTS:

The monomers HEMA, CQ, BisGMA, GPDM, 10-MDP and UDMA eluted from the dental materials and were able to diffuse through the dentin disks to a certain extent. Compounds with a lower molecular weight (uncured group: HEMA 7850 nmol and CQ 78.2 nmol) were more likely to elute and diffuse compared to monomers with a higher molecular weight (uncured group: BisGMA 0.42 nmol). When the adhesives were left uncured, diffusion was up to 10 times higher compared to the cured conditions.

CONCLUSIONS:

This in-vitro research resulted in the quantification of various monomers able to diffuse through dentin and therefore contributes to a more detailed understanding about the potential exposure of the dental pulp to monomers from dental adhesives.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE:

Biocompatibility of adhesives is important since adhesives may be applied on dentin near the pulp, where tubular density and diameter are greatest.

KEYWORDS:

Dental adhesives; Dentin permeability; Diffusion; Liquid chromatography; Mass spectrometry; Monomers

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