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Am J Primatol. 2018 Jun;80(6):e22867. doi: 10.1002/ajp.22867. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

The gut microbiome of nonhuman primates: Lessons in ecology and evolution.

Clayton JB1,2,3, Gomez A3,4, Amato K3,5, Knights D3,6,7, Travis DA3,8, Blekhman R3,9,10, Knight R3,11,12,13, Leigh S3,14,15, Stumpf R3,15,16, Wolf T3,8, Glander KE3,17, Cabana F3,18, Johnson TJ1,3,19.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota.
2
GreenViet Biodiversity Conservation Center, Son Tra District, Danang, Vietnam.
3
Primate Microbiome Project, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
4
Department of Animal Science, University of Minnesota, St Paul, Minnesota.
5
Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.
6
Biotechnology Institute, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota.
7
Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
8
Department of Veterinary Population Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, Minnesota.
9
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
10
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Falcon Heights, Minnesota.
11
Department of Computer Science & Engineering, UC San Diego, La Jolla, California.
12
Department of Pediatrics, UC San Diego, La Jolla, California.
13
Center for Microbiome Innovation, UC San Diego, La Jolla, California.
14
Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado.
15
C.R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois.
16
Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois.
17
Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.
18
Wildlife Nutrition Centre, Wildlife Reserves Singapore, Singapore.
19
University of Minnesota, Mid-Central Research and Outreach Center, Willmar, Minnesota.

Abstract

The mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to trillions of bacteria that play a substantial role in host metabolism and immunity. While progress has been made in understanding the role that microbial communities play in human health and disease, much less attention has been given to host-associated microbiomes in nonhuman primates (NHPs). Here we review past and current research exploring the gut microbiome of NHPs. First, we summarize methods for characterization of the NHP gut microbiome. Then we discuss variation in gut microbiome composition and function across different NHP taxa. Finally, we highlight how studying the gut microbiome offers new insights into primate nutrition, physiology, and immune system function, as well as enhances our understanding of primate ecology and evolution. Microbiome approaches are useful tools for studying relevant issues in primate ecology. Further study of the gut microbiome of NHPs will offer new insight into primate ecology and evolution as well as human health.

KEYWORDS:

ecology; evolution; microbiome; nonhuman primate (NHP)

PMID:
29862519
DOI:
10.1002/ajp.22867

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