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Q Rev Biol. 2017 Sep;92(3):267-287. doi: 10.1086/693847.

PRINCIPLES AND PATTERNS OF BAT MOVEMENTS: FROM AERODYNAMICS TO ECOLOGY.

Author information

1
Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research 10315 Berlin, Germany, Institute of Biology, Freie Universit├Ąt Berlin 14195 Berlin, Germany.
2
Bat Conservation International Austin, Texas 78716 USA, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, California 95064 USA.
3
School of Biological Sciences, Bristol University Bristol BS8 1TQ United Kingdom.
4
School of Biological Sciences, Bangor University Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW United Kingdom.
5
Applied Zoology and Conservation, University of Greifswald D-17489 Greifswald, Germany.
6
Department of General Biology, Federal University of Minas Gerais 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.
7
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University Bozeman, Montana 59717 USA.
8
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and School of Engineering, Brown University Providence, Rhode Island 02912 USA.
9
Department of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, and the "Sagol" School of Neuroscience, Tel-Aviv University Tel-Aviv, Israel.

Abstract

Movement ecology as an integrative discipline has advanced associated fields because it presents not only a conceptual framework for understanding movement principles but also helps formulate predictions about the consequences of movements for animals and their environments. Here, we synthesize recent studies on principles and patterns of bat movements in context of the movement ecology paradigm. The motion capacity of bats is defined by their highly articulated, flexible wings. Power production during flight follows a U-shaped curve in relation to speed in bats yet, in contrast to birds, bats use mostly exogenous nutrients for sustained flight. The navigation capacity of most bats is dominated by the echolocation system, yet other sensory modalities, including an iron-based magnetic sense, may contribute to navigation depending on a bat's familiarity with the terrain. Patterns derived from these capacities relate to antagonistic and mutualistic interactions with food items. The navigation capacity of bats may influence their sociality, in particular, the extent of group foraging based on eavesdropping on conspecifics' echolocation calls. We infer that understanding the movement ecology of bats within the framework of the movement ecology paradigm provides new insights into ecological processes mediated by bats, from ecosystem services to diseases.

KEYWORDS:

biomechanics; cognition; echolocation; emerging infectious diseases; energetics; migration; mutualism; sociality

PMID:
29861509
PMCID:
PMC5983048
DOI:
10.1086/693847
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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