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Am J Emerg Med. 2018 Aug;36(8):1522.e1-1522.e3. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2018.04.034. Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Facial nerve palsy following mild mastoid trauma on trampoline.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, University of North Carolina, 170 Manning Drive, Campus Box 7060, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: mcools@unch.unc.edu.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, University of North Carolina, 170 Manning Drive, Campus Box 7060, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: kevin_carneiro@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

We present a case report of a 14-year-old boy who was jumping on a trampoline when he struck his right mastoid on a support pole. The following day, he developed a right-sided facial droop and inability to close his right eye. He presented to the emergency department, where CT of his temporal bone was negative and he was started on prednisone. Over the next month, he had spontaneous recovery of his facial nerve (FN) function. In cases of traumatic FN palsy, urgent referral to otolaryngology is needed, even without a fracture of the temporal bone, as edema within the facial nerve could require decompressive surgery. Steroids, while used in this patient, are of questionable benefit in the limited data available. Patient's with traumatic FN palsies should be instructed to use eye lubricant frequently and tape his eye closed at night, as corneal drying could lead to permanent damage. Proper evaluation, management, and referral are needed in cases of traumatic FN palsy to prevent long-term morbidity.

KEYWORDS:

Bell's palsy; Facial nerve; Trampoline

PMID:
29861376
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajem.2018.04.034

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