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Behav Brain Res. 2018 Oct 1;351:1-3. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2018.05.027. Epub 2018 May 31.

Acute oral cannabidiolic acid methyl ester reduces depression-like behavior in two genetic animal models of depression.

Author information

1
Psychology Department, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel; Gonda Brain Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel.
2
Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel.
3
Gonda Brain Research Center, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel.
4
Institute for Drug Research, Medical Faculty, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91120, Israel.
5
Geha Mental Health Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
6
Geha Mental Health Center, Petah Tiqva, Israel; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. Electronic address: shovgal@tau.ac.il.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Cannabidiolic acid methyl ester (HU-580) was recently shown to reduce stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats. The aim of this study was to examine the antidepressant effect of HU-580 in two different rat models of depression.

EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH:

Using the forced swim test (FST), we evaluated the effect of HU-580 in 43 Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and 23 Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) adult male rats.

KEY RESULTS:

1 mg/kg HU-580 reduced immobility and increased swimming in WKY rats, compared to vehicle-treated controls (p < 0.05). This dose exerted similar effects in FSL rats (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS:

This is the first report of antidepressant efficacy of HU-580. These findings expand the very limited existent results, suggesting that HU-580 is a potent anxiolytic agent. Taken together with its chemical stability, HU-580 emerges as a candidate for a future antidepressant medication.

KEYWORDS:

Cannabidiolic acid methyl ester; Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL); Forced swim test (FST); Genetic animal models of depression; Major depression disorder (MDD); Wistar–Kyoto (WKY)

PMID:
29860002
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2018.05.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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