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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2018 Sep;76(9):1929.e1-1929.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2018.05.011. Epub 2018 May 15.

Prevalence of Panoramically Imaged Carotid Atheromas in Alcoholic Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis and Comorbid Diabetes.

Author information

1
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery VA Special Fellow, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA.
2
Director of Research Fellowship and Inpatient Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, and Instructor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.
3
Clinical Researcher, Hospital Regional Universitario Jose Maria Cabral y Baez, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.
4
Chief of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, and Professor in Residence Medicine-Gastroenterology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.
5
Associate Chief of Staff/Graduate Medical Education, Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System; Director, Quality Assurance Hospital Dental Service, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center; and Professor-in-Residence of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA. Electronic address: arthur.friedlander@va.gov.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Men with alcohol-related chronic pancreatitis (ARCP) resulting in type 3c diabetes mellitus (DM) are at a uniquely elevated risk of adverse ischemic events given the role of inflammation in both the underlying disease processes and atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that their panoramic images would show a prevalence of calcified carotid artery atheromas (calcified carotid artery plaques [CCAPs]) significantly more often than a general population of similarly aged men.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

We implemented a retrospective observational study. The sample was composed of male patients older than 30 years having panoramic images. The predictor variable was a diagnosis of ARCP-DM, and the outcome variable was the prevalence rate of CCAPs. The prevalence of CCAPs among the patients with ARCP-DM was then compared with that of a historical general population composed of similarly aged men. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and the P value was set at .05.

RESULTS:

Of the 32 men (mean age, 61.7 ± 11.2 years) with ARCP-DM, 8 (25%) (mean age, 63.3 ± 4.80 years) had atheromas (CCAPs). There was a statistically significant (P < .05) association between a diagnosis of ARCP-DM and the presence of an atheroma on the panoramic image in comparison with the 3% rate manifested by the historical general-population cohort. The presence or absence of classic atherogenic risk factors within the ARCP-DM cohort failed to distinguish between individuals with and individuals without atheroma formation on their panoramic images.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study suggest that CCAP, a risk indicator for future adverse cardiovascular events, is frequently seen on the panoramic images of male patients with ARCP-DM. Dentists treating male patients with the disorder must be uniquely vigilant for the presence of these lesions.

PMID:
29859950
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2018.05.011

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