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J Adolesc. 2018 Aug;67:1-11. doi: 10.1016/j.adolescence.2018.05.009. Epub 2018 May 30.

Assessing the impacts and outcomes of youth driven mental health promotion: A mixed-methods assessment of the Social Networking Action for Resilience study.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, T201-2211 Westbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T 2B5. Electronic address: emily.jenkins@ubc.ca.
2
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, T201-2211 Westbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T 2B5. Electronic address: vicky.bungay@nursing.ubc.ca.
3
University of Lethbridge, The Prentice Institute for Global and Population Economy, Suite L1184-4401 University Drive West, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4, Canada. Electronic address: andrew.patterson@uleth.ca.
4
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, T201-2211 Westbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T 2B5. Electronic address: elizabeth.saewyc@ubc.ca.
5
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Blusson Hall Room 1130, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 1S6, Canada. Electronic address: joy_johnson@sfu.ca.

Abstract

Mental health challenges are the leading health issue facing youth globally. To better respond to this health challenge, experts advocate for a population health approach inclusive of mental health promotion; yet this area remains underdeveloped. Further, while there is growing emphasis on youth-engaged research and intervention design, evidence of the outcomes and impacts are lacking. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to addressing these gaps, presenting findings from the Social Networking Action for Resilience (SONAR) study, an exploration of youth-driven mental health promotion in a rural community in British Columbia, Canada. Mixed methods including pre- and post-intervention surveys (n = 175) and qualitative interviews (n = 10) captured the outcomes and impacts of the intervention on indicators of mental health, the relationship between level of engagement and benefit, and community perceptions of impact. Findings demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of youth engaged research and intervention at an individual and community-level.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent mental health; Community connectedness; Community-based knowledge translation; Mental health promotion; Resilience; Youth engagement

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