Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biomed Res Int. 2018 Apr 26;2018:3167037. doi: 10.1155/2018/3167037. eCollection 2018.

The Role of Periostin in Capsule Formation on Silicone Implants.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 07061, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul 07061, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080, Republic of Korea.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Although silicone implants are widely used in breast and other reconstructive surgeries, the limited biocompatibility of these materials leads to severe complications, including capsular contracture. Here, we aimed to clarify the relationship between periostin and the process of capsule formation after in vivo implantation. Seven-week-old wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice and periostin-deficient mice were used. Round silicone implants were inserted into a subcutaneous pocket on the dorsum of the mice. After 8 weeks, the fibrous capsule around the implant was harvested and histologically examined to estimate capsular thickness and the number of inflammatory cells. Additionally, immunohistochemical analysis (periostin, α-SMA, and collagen type I) and western blotting (CTGF, TGF-β, VEGF, and MPO) were performed for a more detailed analysis of capsule formation. The capsules in periostin-knockout mice (PN-KO) were significantly thinner than those in WT mice. PN-KO mice showed significantly lower numbers of inflammatory cells than WT mice. Fibrous tissue formation markers (α-SMA, periostin, collagen type I, and CTGF) were significantly reduced in PN-KO mice. We also confirmed that inflammatory reaction and angiogenesis indicators (TGF-β, MPO, and VEGF) had lower expression in PN-KO mice. Inhibition of periostin could be important for suppressing capsule formation on silicone implants after in vivo implantation.

PMID:
29854742
PMCID:
PMC5944282
DOI:
10.1155/2018/3167037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Hindawi Limited Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center