Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2018 Jun 5;71(22):2570-2584. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2018.04.020.

Supplemental Vitamins and Minerals for CVD Prevention and Treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Unit, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Clinical Nutrition Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: david.jenkins@utoronto.ca.
2
Stroke Prevention & Atherosclerosis Research Centre, Robarts Research Institute, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
3
Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Gastroenterology, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
7
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Unit, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Clinical Nutrition Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
8
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Clinical Nutrition Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
9
Clinical Nutrition Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
10
AgroParisTech, Paris Institute of Technology for Life, Food and Environmental Sciences, Paris, France.
11
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Unit, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Clinical Nutrition Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
12
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Clinical Nutrition Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada.
13
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Toronto 3D Knowledge Synthesis and Clinical Trials Unit, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Clinical Nutrition Risk Factor Modification Centre, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

The authors identified individual randomized controlled trials from previous meta-analyses and additional searches, and then performed meta-analyses on cardiovascular disease outcomes and all-cause mortality. The authors assessed publications from 2012, both before and including the U.S. Preventive Service Task Force review. Their systematic reviews and meta-analyses showed generally moderate- or low-quality evidence for preventive benefits (folic acid for total cardiovascular disease, folic acid and B-vitamins for stroke), no effect (multivitamins, vitamins C, D, β-carotene, calcium, and selenium), or increased risk (antioxidant mixtures and niacin [with a statin] for all-cause mortality). Conclusive evidence for the benefit of any supplement across all dietary backgrounds (including deficiency and sufficiency) was not demonstrated; therefore, any benefits seen must be balanced against possible risks.

KEYWORDS:

all-cause mortality; meta-analysis; supplements

PMID:
29852980
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2018.04.020
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center