Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biol Psychol. 2018 Jul;136:119-126. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.05.018. Epub 2018 May 28.

Neural network communication facilitates verbal working memory.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstraße 10, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.kustermann@uni-konstanz.de.
2
Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstraße 10, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. Electronic address: brigitte.rockstroh@uni-konstanz.de.
3
Department of Psychology and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA, 1285 Franz Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, United States. Electronic address: gamiller@ucla.edu.
4
Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstraße 10, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. Electronic address: tzvetan.popov@uni-konstanz.de.

Abstract

Oscillatory brain activity in the theta, alpha, and gamma frequency ranges has been associated with working memory (WM). In addition to alpha and theta activity associated with WM retention, and gamma band activity with item encoding, activity in the alpha band is related to the deployment of attention resources and information. The present study sought to specify distinct roles of neuromagnetic 4-7 Hz theta, 9-13 Hz alpha, and 50-70 Hz gamma power modulation and communication in fronto-parietal networks during cued, hemifield-specific item presentation in a modified Sternberg verbal WM task in 14 student volunteers. Lateralized posterior alpha and gamma power during encoding suggest a preparatory role of alpha oscillations. Bilateral alpha power increases during maintenance reflect information retention for the non-lateralized probe response. Lateralized alpha power increase during encoding was apparently driven by a monotonic increase in fronto-parietal 6 Hz phase, suggesting a mechanism facilitating WM encoding and successful performance.

KEYWORDS:

Brain response; Connectivity; Executive function; Lateralized; MEG; Oscillations; Phase synchrony; Working memory

PMID:
29852214
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.05.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center