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Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Jun;97(22):e10921. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000010921.

The effect of low-dose rocuronium on rapid tracheal intubation using a video laryngoscope: A randomized double blind controlled study.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, College of Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan.
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness of rocuronium in low doses on conditions during rapid tracheal intubation using video laryngoscope.

METHODS:

Ninety-eight patients undergoing otolaryngologic surgery were randomly divided into 2 groups: group L using 0.3 mg/kg of rocuronium intravenously (n = 49) and group C using 0.6 mg/kg of rocuronium (n = 49). Sixty seconds after rocuronium administration, tracheal intubation was performed using a video laryngoscope. The overall intubation condition was evaluated along with specific conditions, including laryngoscopy condition, vocal cord position, and intubation response. Intubation profiles, including Cormack-Lehane grade, 1st attempt success rate, and intubation time, were also evaluated.

RESULTS:

Overall intubation conditions showed a significant difference between group L and group C (P = .003). Although the incidence of vigorous response after tracheal intubation was higher in group L than in group C (P = .022), laryngoscopy condition and vocal cord position were similar between the 2 groups (P = .145 and .070, respectively). Intubation profiles showed no differences between the 2 groups. The frequency and amount of additional rocuronium administration during surgery were also similar.

CONCLUSIONS:

Low-dose rocuronium provided significantly worse overall intubation conditions compared to the conventional dose of rocuronium for rapid tracheal intubation. However, when using a video laryngoscope, it may provide clinically acceptable laryngeal muscle relaxation.

PMID:
29851824
PMCID:
PMC6392944
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000010921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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