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Sci Rep. 2018 May 29;8(1):8186. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-26498-y.

Possible Obesogenic Effects of Bisphenols Accumulation in the Human Brain.

Author information

1
Cyprus International Institute for Environmental and Public Health, Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, 3041, Cyprus.
2
Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Pathology & Medical Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
4
Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
5
Cyprus International Institute for Environmental and Public Health, Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol, 3041, Cyprus. konstantinos.makris@cut.ac.cy.
6
Department of Endocrinology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. j.v.van.vliet@umcg.nl.

Abstract

Evidence of bisphenols' obesogenic effects on humans is mixed and inconsistent. We aimed to explore the presence of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF) and chlorinated BPA (ClBPA), collectively called the bisphenols, in different brain regions and their association with obesity using post-mortem hypothalamic and white matter brain material from twelve pairs of obese (body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2) and normal-weight individuals (BMI <25 kg/m2). Mean ratios of hypothalamus:white matter for BPA, BPF and ClBPA were 1.5, 0.92, 0.95, respectively, suggesting no preferential accumulation of the bisphenols in the grey matter (hypothalamic) or white matter-enriched brain areas. We observed differences in hypothalamic concentrations among the bisphenols, with highest median level detected for ClBPA (median: 2.4 ng/g), followed by BPF (2.2 ng/g) and BPA (1.2 ng/g); similar ranking was observed for the white matter samples (median for: ClBPA-2.5 ng/g, BPF-2.3 ng/g, and BPA-1.0 ng/g). Furthermore, all bisphenol concentrations, except for white-matter BPF were associated with obesity (p < 0.05). This is the first study reporting the presence of bisphenols in two distinct regions of the human brain. Bisphenols accumulation in the white matter-enriched brain tissue could signify that they are able to cross the blood-brain barrier.

PMID:
29844501
PMCID:
PMC5974368
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-018-26498-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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