Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Health. 2018 May 29;17(1):50. doi: 10.1186/s12940-018-0394-x.

The Ramazzini Institute 13-week pilot study on glyphosate and Roundup administered at human-equivalent dose to Sprague Dawley rats: effects on the microbiome.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1428 Madison, New York, NY, 10029, USA.
2
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Translational Cancer Research, Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Hospital, Nanjing, China.
3
Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center (CMCRC), Ramazzini Institute (RI), Via Saliceto, 3, 40010 Bentivoglio, Bologna, Italy.
4
Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
5
Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
6
Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1428 Madison, New York, NY, 10029, USA.
7
Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center (CMCRC), Ramazzini Institute (RI), Via Saliceto, 3, 40010 Bentivoglio, Bologna, Italy. belpoggif@ramazzini.it.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) are broad-spectrum herbicides that act on the shikimate pathway in bacteria, fungi, and plants. The possible effects of GBHs on human health are the subject of an intense public debate for both its potential carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects, including its effects on microbiome. The present pilot study examines whether exposure to GBHs at doses of glyphosate considered to be "safe" (the US Acceptable Daily Intake - ADI - of 1.75 mg/kg bw/day), starting from in utero, may modify the composition of gut microbiome in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats.

METHODS:

Glyphosate alone and Roundup, a commercial brand of GBHs, were administered in drinking water at doses comparable to the US glyphosate ADI (1.75 mg/kg bw/day) to F0 dams starting from the gestational day (GD) 6 up to postnatal day (PND) 125. Animal feces were collected at multiple time points from both F0 dams and F1 pups. The gut microbiota of 433 fecal samples were profiled at V3-V4 region of 16S ribosomal RNA gene and further taxonomically assigned and assessed for diversity analysis. We tested the effect of exposure on overall microbiome diversity using PERMANOVA and on individual taxa by LEfSe analysis.

RESULTS:

Microbiome profiling revealed that low-dose exposure to Roundup and glyphosate resulted in significant and distinctive changes in overall bacterial composition in F1 pups only. Specifically, at PND31, corresponding to pre-pubertal age in humans, relative abundance for Bacteriodetes (Prevotella) was increased while the Firmicutes (Lactobacillus) was reduced in both Roundup and glyphosate exposed F1 pups compared to controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study provides initial evidence that exposures to commonly used GBHs, at doses considered safe, are capable of modifying the gut microbiota in early development, particularly before the onset of puberty. These findings warrant future studies on potential health effects of GBHs in early development such as childhood.

KEYWORDS:

Early developmental stage; Glyphosate; Gut microbiome; Roundup

PMID:
29843725
PMCID:
PMC5972442
DOI:
10.1186/s12940-018-0394-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center