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PLoS One. 2018 May 29;13(5):e0197501. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197501. eCollection 2018.

The poly-gamma-glutamate of Bacillus subtilis interacts specifically with silver nanoparticles.

Author information

1
BIG, LCBM, ProMD, UMR CNRS-CEA-UGA, Grenoble, France.
2
ISTerre, CNRS-UGA, Grenoble, France.
3
BIG, BGE, EDyP, INSERM-CEA-UGA, Grenoble, France.

Abstract

For many years, silver nanoparticles, as with other antibacterial nanoparticles, have been extensively used in manufactured products. However, their fate in the environment is unclear and raises questions. We studied the fate of silver nanoparticles in the presence of bacteria under growth conditions that are similar to those found naturally in the environment (that is, bacteria in a stationary phase with low nutrient concentrations). We demonstrated that the viability and the metabolism of a gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus subtilis, exposed during the stationary phase is unaffected by 1 mg/L of silver nanoparticles. These results can be partly explained by a physical interaction of the poly-gamma-glutamate (PGA) secreted by Bacillus subtilis with the silver nanoparticles. The coating of the silver nanoparticles by the secreted PGA likely results in a loss of the bioavailability of nanoparticles and, consequently, a decrease of their biocidal effect.

PMID:
29813090
PMCID:
PMC5973573
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0197501
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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