Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Vasc Surg. 2018 Nov;68(5):1422-1429. doi: 10.1016/j.jvs.2018.02.052. Epub 2018 May 24.

The importance of the superficial and profunda femoris arteries in limb salvage following endovascular treatment of chronic aortoiliac occlusive disease.

Author information

1
Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: rafaelsoon@hotmail.com.
2
Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to report the long-term limb salvage, survival and patency rates of endovascular treatment for aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) when outflow was achieved through the profunda femoris artery (PFA) only vs both the PFA and superficial femoral artery (SFA).

METHODS:

From January 2008 to July 2016, patients with AIOD who underwent aortoiliac angioplasty at the Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo, Brazil, were classified into two groups according to whether they had femoral outflow via the PFA only (group 1) or both the PFA and SFA (group 2) in the affected leg. The primary outcome was amputation-free survival. The secondary outcomes were the patency and overall survival rates.

RESULTS:

In total, 69 aortoiliac angioplasties were performed in 69 patients: 22 patients (31.8%) in group 1 and 47 (67.2%) in group 2. A total of 12 reinterventions (17.4%) were performed, seven (31.8%) in group 1 and five (10.2%) in group 2, without statistical significance between the groups (P = .063). The mean clinical follow-up period was 2500 ± 880.5 days. Both the primary and secondary patency rates analyzed at 1800 days were similar between groups 1 and 2 (80.2% vs 82.3%; P = .80 and 84.7% vs 97.6%; P = .10, respectively). Furthermore, the limb salvage rates at 1800 days were similar between groups 1 and 2 (91.3% vs 86.1%; P = .60), as were the survival rates (74.7% vs 78%; P = .80). The Bollinger score was worse in group 1 (P = .001), as expected, because of occlusion of the SFA. However, the PFA and popliteal artery scores were similar between the two groups. Occlusion of the SFA did not influence the limb salvage rate according to univariate analysis (P = .509) and multivariate Cox regression analysis (P = .671).

CONCLUSIONS:

The patency of the SFA does not interfere with the outcomes of endovascular treatment for chronic AIOD. The PFA in conjunction with the popliteal artery as the sole outflow route for iliac endovascular treatment is associated with similar patency, survival, and limb salvage rates as those for outflow through both the PFA and SFA.

KEYWORDS:

Amputation; Aortoiliac occlusive disease; Critical limb ischemia; Endovascular treatment; Iliac stenting; Limb salvage

Comment in

PMID:
29804745
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvs.2018.02.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center