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Soc Sci Med. 2018 Jul;208:126-133. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.05.020. Epub 2018 May 7.

"Like finding a unicorn": Healthcare preferences among lesbian, gay, and bisexual people in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA; The Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: ajm2230@cumc.columbia.edu.
2
Department of Sociomedical Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA.
3
Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
5
The Williams Institute, UCLA School of Law, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) peoples' healthcare preferences are often developed in response to social and institutional factors that can ultimately deter them from care. Prior qualitative explorations of LGB healthcare preferences have been limited in their ability to identify and compare patterns across age cohort, gender, and race/ethnicity. The current study examines qualitative data from 186 modified Life Story Interviews with three age cohorts of LGB people from New York City, NY, San Francisco, CA, Tucson, AZ, and Austin, TX to understand the factors influencing LGB people's healthcare preferences. Data are analyzed using a directed content analysis approach. Five key themes emerged regarding influences on healthcare preferences: Stigma, provider expertise, identity, service type, and access. Findings suggest that healthcare preferences among LGB people are both complex and closely linked to social changes over time. Healthcare preferences among LGB people are both complex and closely linked to social changes over time.

KEYWORDS:

And bisexual health; Gay; Healthcare access; Lesbian; United States

PMID:
29803970
DOI:
10.1016/j.socscimed.2018.05.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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