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Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc. 2018 Jul;52(4):308-314. doi: 10.1016/j.aott.2018.05.003. Epub 2018 May 24.

Isokinetic peak torque and flexibility changes of the hamstring muscles after eccentric training: Trained versus untrained subjects.

Author information

1
Department of Biomechanics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt. Electronic address: amralmaz@yahoo.com.
2
Department for Musculoskeletal Disorders and Its Surgery, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt.
3
Department of Biomechanics, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of eccentric isotonic training on hamstring flexibility and eccentric and concentric isokinetic peak torque in trained and untrained subjects.

METHODS:

Sixty healthy subjects (mean age: 21.66 ± 2.64) were divided into three equal groups, each with 20 voluntary participants. Two experimental groups (untrained and trained groups) participated in a hamstring eccentric isotonic strengthening program (five days/week) for a six-week period and one control group that was not involved in the training program. The passive knee extension range of motion and hamstring eccentric and concentric isokinetic peak torque were measured at angular velocities 60° and 120°/s for all groups before and after the training period.

RESULTS:

Two-way analysis of variance showed that there was a significant increase in the hamstring flexibility of the untrained and trained groups (25.65 ± 6.32°, 26.55 ± 5.99°, respectively), (p < 0.05) without a significant increase in the control group (31.55 ± 5.84°), (p > 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant increase in eccentric isokinetic peak torque of both the untrained and trained groups (127.25 ± 22.60Nm, 139.65 ± 19.15Nm, 125.40 ± 21.61Nm, 130.90 ± 18.71Nm, respectively), (p < 0.05) without a significant increase in the control group (109.15 ± 20.89Nm, 105.70 ± 21.31Nm, respectively), (p > 0.05) at both angular velocities. On the other hand, there was no significant increase in the concentric isokinetic peak torque of the three groups (92.50 ± 20.50Nm, 79.05 ± 18.95Nm, 92.20 ± 21.96Nm, 79.85 ± 18.97Nm, 100.45 ± 25.78Nm, 83.40 ± 23.73Nm, respectively), (p > 0.05) at both angular velocities. The change scores in the hamstring flexibility (06.25 ± 1.86°) and eccentric peak torque of the untrained group (16.60 ± 4.81Nm, 17.45 ± 5.40Nm, respectively) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those of the trained group (03.40 ± 1.14°, 9.90 ± 5.14Nm, 9.80 ± 7.57Nm, respectively), and the control group (00.90 ± 2.10°, 0.60 ± 2.93Nm, 1.40 ± 3.53Nm, respectively), at both angular velocities. Meanwhile, the change scores of the concentric peak torques of the three groups (1.15 ± 1.50Nm, -0.15 ± 2.16Nm, 1.35 ± 1.63Nm, 0.20 ± 2.95Nm, 0.60 ± 2.28Nm, -0.30 ± 2.25Nm) were statistically insignificant (p > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

After a six-week period of eccentric isotonic training, the hamstring eccentric peak torque and flexibility of trained and untrained groups improved without changes in the concentric peak torque. Moreover, the improvement of untrained subjects was higher than trained subjects. These findings may be helpful in designing the hamstring rehabilitation program.

KEYWORDS:

Eccentric exercise; Extensibility; Hamstring; Muscle torque; Trained subjects

PMID:
29803678
PMCID:
PMC6150446
DOI:
10.1016/j.aott.2018.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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