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Biol Psychol. 2018 Jul;136:87-99. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.05.016. Epub 2018 May 23.

Cortical hypoactivation during resting EEG suggests central nervous system pathology in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Center for Community Research, DePaul University, 990 West Fullerton Ave., Suite 3100, Chicago, IL 60614, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, Center for Community Research, DePaul University, 990 West Fullerton Ave., Suite 3100, Chicago, IL 60614, USA. Electronic address: ljason@depaul.edu.

Abstract

We investigated central fatigue in 50 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and 50 matched healthy controls (HC). Resting state EEG was collected from 19 scalp locations during a 3 min, eyes-closed condition. Current densities were localized using exact low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA). The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) and the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) were administered to all participants. Independent t-tests and linear regression analyses were used to evaluate group differences in current densities, followed by statistical non-parametric mapping (SnPM) correction procedures. Significant differences were found in the delta (1-3 Hz) and beta-2 (19-21 Hz) frequency bands. Delta sources were found predominately in the frontal lobe, while beta-2 sources were found in the medial and superior parietal lobe. Left-lateralized, frontal delta sources were associated with a clinical reduction in motivation. The implications of abnormal cortical sources in patients with CFS are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Arousal; Chronic fatigue syndrome; EEG; MFI-20; Myalgic encephalomyelitis; Neuroinflammation; eLORETA

PMID:
29802861
PMCID:
PMC6064389
[Available on 2019-07-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.05.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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