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Can J Cardiol. 2018 Jun;34(6):736-743. doi: 10.1016/j.cjca.2018.02.005. Epub 2018 Feb 10.

Long-term Follow-up of the Trial of Routine Angioplasty and Stenting After Fibrinolysis to Enhance Reperfusion in Acute Myocardial Infarction (TRANSFER-AMI).

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Tel Aviv Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
2
Schulich Heart Centre, Division of Cardiology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
3
St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Department of Cardiology, Southlake Regional Health Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
5
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES), Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
6
Canadian Heart Research Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
7
Schwartz/Reisman Emergency Medicine Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
8
St Boniface General Hospital, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
9
Halton Healthcare Services, Oakville Hospital, Oakville, Ontario, Canada.
10
Robert and Dorothy Pitts Chair of Acute Care and Emergency Medicine, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
11
University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
12
Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
13
St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Canadian Heart Research Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: goodmans@smh.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Trial of Routine Angioplasty and Stenting after Fibrinolysis to Enhance Reperfusion in Acute Myocardial Infarction (TRANSFER-AMI) demonstrated superiority of routine early coronary angiography (and percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI]) compared with standard therapy in fibrinolytic-treated patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at 30 days. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the long-term (>7 year) effects of an early invasive strategy.

METHODS:

We linked the study cohort and administrative datasets to assess long-term follow-up status including repeat procedures, hospitalizations, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the relationship between randomized treatment and long-term adverse outcomes.

RESULTS:

A total of 881 patients had long-term follow-up and were included in our study. After a mean follow-up of 7.8 years, there were no significant differences in death, myocardial infarction (MI), unstable angina, stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), or heart failure admissions (hazard ratio [HR] 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-1.13]; P = 0.41) between those randomized to an early invasive vs standard treatment strategy. Following the index hospitalization, there were no significant difference in the rates of coronary revascularization between the early invasive and the standard therapy groups (81 [19.3%] vs 76 [17.9%]; P = 0.61).

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite the short-term benefit and safety of an early invasive strategy in patients with STEMI receiving fibrinolysis, no statistically significant differences in MACE were observed over 7.8 years.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00164190.

PMID:
29801739
DOI:
10.1016/j.cjca.2018.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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