Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Infect Dis. 2018 Sep 8;218(8):1210-1218. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy320.

Live Attenuated Zoster Vaccine Boosts Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV)-Specific Humoral Responses Systemically and at the Cervicovaginal Mucosa of Kenyan VZV-Seropositive Women.

Author information

1
Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2
Kenyan AIDS Vaccine Initiative-Institute of Clinical Research, Nairobi, Kenya.
3
Keenan Research Centre for Biomedical Science of St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
4
Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Nairobi, Kenya.
5
Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
6
Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa, Durban.
7
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

Abstract

Background:

Attenuated varicella zoster virus (VZV) is a promising vector for recombinant vaccines. Because human immunodeficiencyvirus (HIV) vaccines are believed to require mucosal immunogenicity, we characterized mucosal VZV-specific humoral immunity following VZVOka vaccination.

Methods:

Adult Kenyan VZV-seropositive women (n = 44) received a single dose of the live zoster VZVOka vaccine. The anamnestic responses to the virus were followed longitudinally in both plasma and mucosal secretions using an in-house glycoprotein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and safety and reactogenicity monitored. VZV seroprevalence and baseline responses to the virus were also characterized in our cohorts (n = 288).

Results:

Besides boosting anti-VZV antibody responses systemically, vaccination also boosted anti-VZV immunity in the cervicovaginal mucosa with a 2.9-fold rise in immunoglobulin G (P < .0001) and 1.6-fold rise in immunoglobulin A (IgA) (P = .004) from the time before immunization and 4 weeks postvaccination. Baseline analysis demonstrated high avidity antibodies at the gastrointestinal and genital mucosa of VZV-seropositive women. Measurement of VZV-specific IgA in saliva is a sensitive tool for detecting prior VZV infection.

Conclusions:

VZVOka vaccine was safe and immunogenic in VZV-seropositive adult Kenyan women. We provided compelling evidence of VZV ability to induce genital mucosa immunity.

Clinical Trials Registration:

NCT02514018.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center