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Stroke. 2018 Jul;49(7):1751-1754. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.118.021789. Epub 2018 May 24.

Antiplatelet Therapy, Cerebral Microbleeds, and Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
From the Department of Neurology, Cerebrovascular Disease Center, People's Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, People's Republic of China.
2
From the Department of Neurology, Cerebrovascular Disease Center, People's Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, People's Republic of China. wangyujie196508@163.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Antiplatelet therapy is associated with the presence of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) with limited studies. We further investigate the topic focusing on different effects of antiplatelet therapy on strict lobar and deep/infratentorial MBs.

METHODS:

We searched PubMed and EMBASE from January 1, 1997 to December 1, 2017, for relevant studies, calculated the pooled odds ratios (OR) for CMB incidence and distribution (strictly lobar, deep/infratentorial) in antiplatelet users versus nonantiplatelet users and calculated the OR for the incidence of intracerebral hemorrhage in antiplatelet users with CMBs versus those without.

RESULTS:

We included 20 988 participants from 37 studies. CMBs were more frequent in antiplatelet users than those in nonantiplatelet users (pooled OR, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.36; P=0.002). There was a significant association of antiplatelet therapy with strictly lobar MBs (OR, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-1.84; P=0.002) rather than deep/infratentorial MBs (OR, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-1.90; P=0.062). Intracerebral hemorrhage incidence was higher in participants with CMBs than those without CMBs (OR, 3.40; 95% confidence interval, 2.00-5.78; P=0.000) in antiplatelet users.

CONCLUSIONS:

Antiplatelet drug use was associated with increased risk of strictly lobar MBs and increased the intracerebral hemorrhage incidence in participants with CMBs.

KEYWORDS:

hemosiderin; incidence; magnetic resonance imaging; meta-analysis; risk

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