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Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2018 Aug;37(8):1491-1497. doi: 10.1007/s10096-018-3275-x. Epub 2018 May 23.

Subsequent infection with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in patients with prior infection or fecal colonization.

Author information

1
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy and Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research (CARe), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. anna.u.lindblom@vgregion.se.
2
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Guldhedsgatan 10 A, 413 46, Gothenburg, Sweden. anna.u.lindblom@vgregion.se.
3
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy and Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research (CARe), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
4
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Guldhedsgatan 10 A, 413 46, Gothenburg, Sweden.
5
Swedish Strategic Program Against Antimicrobial Resistance (Strama), Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

In clinical practice, there is a growing need to assess the impact of prior colonization or infection with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (EPE) on new EPE infections. We have investigated the frequency of, and duration to, a subsequent EPE infection in patients with prior fecal carriage or infection with EPE. Culture data for 3272 EPE-positive patients in Western Sweden during 2004-2014 were evaluated. The median follow-up time was 3.7 years. The first recorded EPE-positive fecal screen, or clinical (urine, blood) culture, and subsequent EPE-positive clinical samples were analyzed, focusing on the first and last recurrence of EPE infection. ESBL Escherichia coli dominated (95%). Almost all (94%) patients initially positive in fecal screen (n = 1436) and 72 and 71% of those initially positive in urine (n = 1717) and blood (n = 119) had no further EPE clinical isolates. Subsequent EPE bacteremia was only detected in 0.7, 1.6, and 4.2% of the respective patient group. Recurrent EPE-positive urine cultures occurred in 27% (460/1717), most (75%) within 6 months, and rarely (13%) after 1 year. Repeated EPE-positive clinical samples were significantly (p < 0.01) more common in patients > 65 years and in men with ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae. In our low-endemic setting, subsequent EPE infections in previously colonized patients were rare. On the other hand, in patients previously EPE-positive in urine or blood, subsequent EPE urinary tract infections were common, especially within 6 months and in patients > 65 years old.

KEYWORDS:

Bacteremia; E. coli; Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL); Fecal screening; K. pneumoniae; Recurrent infection; Urinary tract infection

PMID:
29796984
DOI:
10.1007/s10096-018-3275-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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