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PLoS One. 2018 May 23;13(5):e0197146. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197146. eCollection 2018.

Incidence of lung cancer histologic cell-types according to neighborhood factors: A population based study in California.

DeRouen MC1,2,3, Hu L4, McKinley M1,3, Gali K5, Patel M6,7,8,9, Clarke C1,9, Wakelee H6,9, Haile R10, Gomez SL1,2,3,11, Cheng I1,2,3,11.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, United States of America.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.
3
Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry, Fremont, CA, United States of America.
4
John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, United States of America.
5
Department of Public Health, School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts, University of California Merced, Merced, CA, United States of America.
6
Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, United States of America.
7
Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, United States of America.
8
Primary Care and Outcomes Research, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, United States of America.
9
Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA, United States of America.
10
Department of Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, United States of America.
11
UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The relationships between neighborhood factors (i.e., neighborhood socioeconomic status (nSES) and ethnic enclave) and histologic subtypes of lung cancer for racial/ethnic groups, particularly Hispanics and Asian American/Pacific Islanders (AAPIs), are poorly understood.

METHODS:

We conducted a population-based study of 75,631 Californians diagnosed with lung cancer from 2008 through2012. We report incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for lung cancer histologic cell-types by nSES among racial/ethnic groups (non-Hispanic (NH) Whites, NH Blacks, Hispanics and AAPIs) and according to Hispanic or Asian neighborhood ethnic enclave status among Hispanics and AAPIs, respectively. In addition, we examined incidence jointly by nSES and ethnic enclave.

RESULTS:

Patterns of lung cancer incidence by nSES and ethnic enclave differed across race/ethnicity, sex, and histologic cell-type. For adenocarcinoma, Hispanic males and females, residing in both low nSES and high nSES neighborhoods that were low enclave, had higher incidence rates compared to those residing in low nSES, high enclave neighborhoods; males (IRR, 1.17 [95% CI, 1.04-1.32] and IRR, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.02-1.29], respectively) and females (IRR, 1.29 [95% CI, 1.15-1.44] and IRR, 1.51 [95% CI, 1.36-1.67], respectively). However, AAPI males residing in both low and high SES neighborhoods that were also low enclave had lower adenocarcinoma incidence.

CONCLUSIONS:

Neighborhood factors differentially influence the incidence of lung cancer histologic cell-types with heterogeneity in these associations by race/ethnicity and sex. For Hispanic males and females and AAPI males, neighborhood ethnic enclave status is strongly associated with lung adenocarcinoma incidence.

PMID:
29791458
PMCID:
PMC5965814
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0197146
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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