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J Sleep Res. 2019 Feb;28(1):e12712. doi: 10.1111/jsr.12712. Epub 2018 May 22.

Sleep duration and mortality - Does weekend sleep matter?

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Department of Medicine, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Department of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy.
5
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Center for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas.
8
Department of Medicine, Clinic of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Previous studies have found a U-shaped relationship between mortality and (weekday) sleep duration. We here address the association of both weekday and weekend sleep duration with overall mortality. A cohort of 43,880 subjects was followed for 13 years through record-linkages. Cox proportional hazards regression models with attained age as time-scale were fitted to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for mortality; stratified analyses on age (<65 years, ≥65 years) were conducted. Among individuals <65 years old, short sleep (≤5 hr) during weekends at baseline was associated with a 52% higher mortality rate (hazard ratios 1.52; 95% confidence intervals 1.15-2.02) compared with the reference group (7 hr), while no association was observed for long (≥9 hr) weekend sleep. When, instead, different combinations of weekday and weekend sleep durations were analysed, we observed a detrimental association with consistently sleeping ≤5 hr (hazard ratios 1.65; 95% confidence intervals 1.22-2.23) or ≥8 hr (hazard ratios 1.25; 95% confidence intervals 1.05-1.50), compared with consistently sleeping 6-7 hr per day (reference). The mortality rate among participants with short sleep during weekdays, but long sleep during weekends, did not differ from the rate of the reference group. Among individuals ≥65 years old, no association between weekend sleep or weekday/weekend sleep durations and mortality was observed. In conclusion, short, but not long, weekend sleep was associated with an increased mortality in subjects <65 years. In the same age group, short sleep (or long sleep) on both weekdays and weekend showed increased mortality. Possibly, long weekend sleep may compensate for short weekday sleep.

KEYWORDS:

aging; compensation; long; rested; short; weekday; weekend

PMID:
29790200
DOI:
10.1111/jsr.12712

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