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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 May 22;15(5). pii: E1049. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15051049.

From Evidence-Based Research to Practice-Based Evidence: Disseminating a Web-Based Computer-Tailored Workplace Sitting Intervention through a Health Promotion Organisation.

Author information

1
Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. Katrien.DeCocker@usq.edu.au.
2
Institute of Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield Central, QLD 4300, Australia. Katrien.DeCocker@usq.edu.au.
3
Department of Movement and Sports Sciences, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium. Greet.Cardon@ugent.be.
4
Institute of Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield Central, QLD 4300, Australia. Jason.Bennie@usq.edu.au.
5
School of Health and Wellbeing, University of Southern Queensland, Ipswich, QLD 4305, Australia. Tracy.Kolbe-Alexander@usq.edu.au.
6
Flemish Institute Healthy Living, 1020 Brussels, Belgium. Femke.DeMeester@gezondleven.be.
7
Institute of Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield Central, QLD 4300, Australia. c.vandelanotte@cqu.edu.au.
8
Physical Activity Research Group, Appleton Institute, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia. c.vandelanotte@cqu.edu.au.

Abstract

Prolonged sitting has been linked to adverse health outcomes; therefore, we developed and examined a web-based, computer-tailored workplace sitting intervention. As we had previously shown good effectiveness, the next stage was to conduct a dissemination study. This study reports on the dissemination efforts of a health promotion organisation, associated costs, reach achieved, and attributes of the website users. The organisation systematically registered all the time and resources invested to promote the intervention. Website usage statistics (reach) and descriptive statistics (website users' attributes) were also assessed. Online strategies (promotion on their homepage; sending e-mails, newsletters, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn posts to professional partners) were the main dissemination methods. The total time investment was 25.6 h, which cost approximately 845 EUR in salaries. After sixteen months, 1599 adults had visited the website and 1500 (93.8%) completed the survey to receive personalized sitting advice. This sample was 38.3 ± 11.0 years, mainly female (76.9%), college/university educated (89.0%), highly sedentary (88.5% sat >8 h/day) and intending to change (93.0%) their sitting. Given the small time and money investment, these outcomes are positive and indicate the potential for wide-scale dissemination. However, more efforts are needed to reach men, non-college/university educated employees, and those not intending behavioural change.

KEYWORDS:

RE-AIM; computer-tailoring; dissemination; e-health; employees; implementation; public health practice; sedentary behaviour; sitting time; translation; worksite

PMID:
29789491
PMCID:
PMC5982088
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph15051049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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