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Pediatr Transplant. 2018 Aug;22(5):e13228. doi: 10.1111/petr.13228. Epub 2018 May 21.

Fairness, severe intellectual disability, and the special case of transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA.
2
Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Manitoba College of Medicine, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Abstract

Children with severe intellectual disability have historically been excluded from solid organ transplantation. The purpose of this article was to review the arguments for excluding this population, including claims of poorer recipient and graft survival, a lower QoL as pediatric recipients become adults, and poorer outcomes for other, more deserving pediatric transplant candidates, and make the case that these arguments are no longer persuasive. We will argue that pediatric transplant centers for reasons of social justice, value of relationships, power differential, and fairness should generally not consider intellectual ability or disability as a criterion when making decisions regarding organ transplant eligibility.

KEYWORDS:

ethics; intellectual disability; transplant

PMID:
29785805
DOI:
10.1111/petr.13228
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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