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Mamm Genome. 2018 Aug;29(7-8):558-576. doi: 10.1007/s00335-018-9749-4. Epub 2018 May 21.

Enterobacteria and host resistance to infection.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
2
McGill Research Center on Complex Traits, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
3
Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
4
U955 - IMRB, Team 10 - Biology of the neuromuscular system, Inserm, École Nationale Vétérinaire d'Alfort, UPEC, Maisons-Alfort, France.
5
Mouse Genetics Laboratory, Department of Genomes and Genetics, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.
6
Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Centre for Chemical and Synthetic Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
7
Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
8
McGill Research Center on Complex Traits, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. danielle.malo@mcgill.ca.
9
Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. danielle.malo@mcgill.ca.
10
Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. danielle.malo@mcgill.ca.

Abstract

Enterobacteriaceae are a large family of Gram-negative, non-spore-forming bacteria. Although many species exist as part of the natural flora of animals including humans, some members are associated with both intestinal and extraintestinal diseases. In this review, we focus on members of this family that have important roles in human disease: Salmonella, Escherichia, Shigella, and Yersinia, providing a brief overview of the disease caused by these bacteria, highlighting the contribution of animal models to our understanding of their pathogenesis and of host genetic determinants involved in susceptibility or resistance to infection.

PMID:
29785663
DOI:
10.1007/s00335-018-9749-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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