Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Neurovirol. 2018 Oct;24(5):587-596. doi: 10.1007/s13365-018-0649-x. Epub 2018 May 21.

Altered cerebro-cerebellum resting-state functional connectivity in HIV-infected male patients.

Author information

1
Centers for Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026, China.
2
Department of Radiology, Beijing Youan Hospital, Capital Medical University, No.8, Xi Tou Tiao, Youanmen Wai, Feng Tai District, Beijing, 10069, China.
3
Centers for Biomedical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026, China. wang506@ustc.edu.cn.
4
Department of Radiology, Beijing Youan Hospital, Capital Medical University, No.8, Xi Tou Tiao, Youanmen Wai, Feng Tai District, Beijing, 10069, China. lihongjun00113@126.com.

Abstract

In addition to the role of planning and executing movement, the cerebellum greatly contributes to cognitive process. Numerous studies have reported structural and functional abnormalities in the cerebellum for HIV-infected patients, but little is known about the altered functional connectivity of particular cerebellar subregions and the cerebrum. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) changes of the cerebellum and further analyze the relationship between the rsFC changes and the neuropsychological evaluation. The experiment involved 26 HIV-infected men with asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment (ANI) and 28 healthy controls (HC). We selected bilateral hemispheric lobule VI and lobule IX as seed regions and mapped the whole-brain rsFC for each subregion. Results revealed that right lobule VI showed significant increased rsFC with the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in HIV-infected subjects. In addition, the correlation analysis on HIV-infected subjects illustrated the increased rsFC was negatively correlated with the attention/working memory score. Moreover, significantly increased cerebellar rsFCs were also observed in HIV-infected patients related to right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and right superior medial gyrus (SMG) while decreased rsFC was just found between right lobule VI and the left hippocampus (HIP). These findings suggested that, abnormalities of cerebro-cerebellar functional connectivity might be associated with cognitive dysfunction in HIV-infected men, particularly working memory impairment. It could also be the underlying mechanism of ANI, providing further evidence for early injury in the neural substrate of HIV-infected patients.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebellum; Functional connectivity; HIV; Resting-state fMRI

PMID:
29785582
DOI:
10.1007/s13365-018-0649-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center