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Card Electrophysiol Clin. 2018 Jun;10(2):183-195. doi: 10.1016/j.ccep.2018.02.002.

Sick Sinus Syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Insubria, Viale Borri, 57, Varese, Varese 21100, Italy. Electronic address: roberto.deponti@uninsubria.it.
2
Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine, University of Insubria, Viale Borri, 57, Varese, Varese 21100, Italy.
3
Arrhythmology Unit, Cardiology Department, Foligno General Hospital, Via Massimo Arcamone, Foligno, Perugia 06034, Italy; Cardiovascular Disease Department, University of Perugia, Piazza Menghini 1, Perugia, Perugia 06129, Italy.
4
Cardiology Department, James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital, University of South Florida, 13000 Bruce B Down Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612, USA.
5
Heart and Vessels Department, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, Florence, Florence 50134, Italy; Cardiology Department, IRCCS Multimedica, Via Milanese, 300, Sesto San Giovanni, Milan 20099, Italy.

Abstract

The sick sinus syndrome includes symptoms and signs related to sinus node dysfunction. This can be caused by intrinsic abnormal impulse formation and/or propagation from the sinus node or, in some cases, by extrinsic reversible causes. Careful evaluation of symptoms and of the electrocardiogram is of crucial importance, because diagnosis is mainly based on these 2 elements. In some cases, the pathophysiologic mechanism that induces sinus node dysfunction also favors the onset of atrial arrhythmias, which results in a more complex clinical condition, known as "bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome."

KEYWORDS:

Bradycardia; Bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome; Sick sinus syndrome; Sinoatrial block; Sinus arrest; Sinus node; Sinus node dysfunction

PMID:
29784479
DOI:
10.1016/j.ccep.2018.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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