Format

Send to

Choose Destination
3D Print Med. 2018;4(1):3. doi: 10.1186/s41205-018-0025-8. Epub 2018 Mar 13.

Patient-specific neurosurgical phantom: assessment of visual quality, accuracy, and scaling effects.

Author information

1
1Department of Physics, Faculty of Philosophy, Science and Letters at Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 3900, Monte Alegre, Ribeirão Preto, SP CEP 14040-901 Brazil.
2
2Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine at Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Background:

Training in medical education depends on the availability of standardized materials that can reliably mimic the human anatomy and physiology. One alternative to using cadavers or animal bodies is to employ phantoms or mimicking devices. Styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) gels are biologically inert and present tunable properties, including mechanical properties that resemble the soft tissue. Therefore, SEBS is an alternative to develop a patient-specific phantom, that provides real visual and morphological experience during simulation-based neurosurgical training.

Results:

A 3D model was reconstructed and printed based on patient-specific magnetic resonance images. The fused deposition of polyactic acid (PLA) filament and selective laser sintering of polyamid were used for 3D printing. Silicone and SEBS materials were employed to mimic soft tissues. A neuronavigation protocol was performed on the 3D-printed models scaled to three different sizes, 100%, 50%, and 25% of the original dimensions. A neurosurgery team (17 individuals) evaluated the phantom realism as "very good" and "perfect" in 49% and 31% of the cases, respectively, and rated phantom utility as "very good" and "perfect" in 61% and 32% of the cases, respectively. Models in original size (100%) and scaled to 50% provided a quantitative and realistic visual analysis of the patient's cortical anatomy without distortion. However, reduction to one quarter of the original size (25%) hindered visualization of surface details and identification of anatomical landmarks.

Conclusions:

A patient-specific phantom was developed with anatomically and spatially accurate shapes, that can be used as an alternative for surgical planning. Printed models scaled to sizes that avoided quality loss might save time and reduce medical training costs.

KEYWORDS:

3D printing; Education; Medical training; Neuronavigation; Neurosurgery; Patient-specific; Phantom; Simulator

Conflict of interest statement

Not applicableFWG is shareholder of Gphantom. All the others disclose no conflict of interest.Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center