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Am J Ind Med. 2018 May 20. doi: 10.1002/ajim.22859. [Epub ahead of print]

Effects of night duty events on blood pressure and autonomic modulation in physicians.

Lee HH1,2, Chen BY3, Pan SC1, Lo SH2, Chen PC1,4, Guo YL1,3,4.

Author information

1
Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei City Hospital, Zhongxing Branch, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan.
4
Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine and NTU Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The dynamic effects of duty events on the blood pressure (BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) of physicians on duty are unknown.

METHODS:

A study was conducted among 12 physicians on night duty. BP and HRV with and without the effect of a duty event were compared. The risk of higher BP and impaired HRV after a phone call were calculated.

RESULTS:

Physicians had higher mean BP (122.4 ± 11.1; 76.9 ± 7.1 mmHg) within 30 min after a phone calls than without a phone call (113.5 ± 5.3; 69.0 ± 3.8) and higher sympathetic tone (low frequency normalized units (LFnu) 68.5 ± 8.9; high frequency normalized units (HFnu) 27.7 ± 8.7) within 10 min of a phone call than without a phone call (62.9 ± 8.51; 33.5 ± 8.4). Elevated BP and sympathetic tone recovered to baseline levels 30 min after a phone call.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among physicians on night duty, sympathetic tone and BP might be elevated by clinical events, and these effects last for 30 min.

KEYWORDS:

blood pressure; clinical events; heart rate variability; physician; quasi-experimental study

PMID:
29781163
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.22859

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