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Open Forum Infect Dis. 2018 Apr 20;5(5):ofy084. doi: 10.1093/ofid/ofy084. eCollection 2018 May.

Incidental Findings on Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Positive and HIV-Negative Persons.

Author information

1
Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, University Hospital, Zurich, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
2
Institute of Medical Virology, University of Zurich, Switzerland.
3
University Department of Medicine and Division of Infectious Diseases and Hospital Epidemiology, Kantonsspital Baselland, University of Basel, Bruderholz, Switzerland.
4
Department of Infectious Diseases, Bern University Hospital, University of Berne, Switzerland.
5
Division of Infectious Diseases, Cantonal Hospital, St. Gall, Switzerland.
6
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cardiac Imaging, University Hospital Zurich, University of Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

Background:

Incidental findings on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) have a great impact on the benefits and costs of testing for cardiovascular disease. The number of incidental findings might be increased in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals compared with the general population. Data are limited regarding the association between incidental findings and HIV infection.

Methods:

We assessed the prevalence and factors associated with incidental findings among HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants ≥45 years undergoing CCTA. Logistic regression was performed to evaluate the factors associated with incidental findings in the HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups. For the analysis of the HIV effect, a propensity score-matched dataset of HIV-positive/HIV-negative participants was used.

Results:

We included 553 participants, 341 with and 212 without HIV infection. Incidental findings were observed in 291 of 553 (53%) patients. In 42 of 553 (7.6%) participants, an incidental finding resulted in additional workup. A malignancy was diagnosed in 2 persons. In the HIV-positive group, age (1.31 per 5 years, 1.10-1.56) and smoking (2.29, 1.43-3.70) were associated with incidental findings; in the HIV-negative group, age (1.26, 1.01-1.59) and a CAC score >0 (2.08, 1.09-4.02) were associated with incidental findings. Human immunodeficiency virus seropositivity did not affect the risk of incidental findings.

Conclusions:

Incidental findings were highly prevalent among HIV-positive and HIV-negative persons. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was not associated with an increased risk of incidental findings.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; coronary CT angiography; incidental findings

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