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Cell. 2018 Jun 28;174(1):44-58.e17. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2018.04.019. Epub 2018 May 17.

The Striatum Organizes 3D Behavior via Moment-to-Moment Action Selection.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Grossman Center for the Statistics of Mind, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA; Departments of Statistics and Computer Science, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
4
Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: srdatta@hms.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Many naturalistic behaviors are built from modular components that are expressed sequentially. Although striatal circuits have been implicated in action selection and implementation, the neural mechanisms that compose behavior in unrestrained animals are not well understood. Here, we record bulk and cellular neural activity in the direct and indirect pathways of dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as mice spontaneously express action sequences. These experiments reveal that DLS neurons systematically encode information about the identity and ordering of sub-second 3D behavioral motifs; this encoding is facilitated by fast-timescale decorrelations between the direct and indirect pathways. Furthermore, lesioning the DLS prevents appropriate sequence assembly during exploratory or odor-evoked behaviors. By characterizing naturalistic behavior at neural timescales, these experiments identify a code for elemental 3D pose dynamics built from complementary pathway dynamics, support a role for DLS in constructing meaningful behavioral sequences, and suggest models for how actions are sculpted over time.

KEYWORDS:

basal ganglia; behavior; coding; direct pathway; ethology; indirect pathway; machine learning; mouse; photometry; striatum

PMID:
29779950
PMCID:
PMC6026065
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2018.04.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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