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Curr Hypertens Rep. 2018 May 19;20(6):52. doi: 10.1007/s11906-018-0850-6.

Insomnia, Short Sleep Duration, and High Blood Pressure: Recent Evidence and Future Directions for the Prevention and Management of Hypertension.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USA.
2
Sleep Research & Treatment Center, Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, 500 University Dr. H073, Hershey, PA, USA. jfmendoza@psu.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To summarize research from the past 2 years on the association between insomnia, short sleep duration, and hypertension and provide a critical analysis of the evidence and suggestions for future directions in this field.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Evidence indicates that the association between insomnia and elevated blood pressure (BP) or stage 1 and 2 hypertension is stronger in those with chronic insomnia, as compared to those with isolated insomnia symptoms, and primarily found in those with the insomnia with objective short sleep duration phenotype. There is a key gap in ambulatory BP monitoring across the sleep-wake cycle as well as in randomized clinical trials testing the effectiveness of pharmacological or cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapies in lowering BP. Insomnia is a strong candidate to join the list of risk factors for hypertension along with obstructive sleep apnea. In the meantime, chronic insomnia should become part of the routine assessment of patients with elevated BP and should be a source for referral, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment, rather than regarded as a symptom of the underlying medical disorder.

KEYWORDS:

Autonomic nervous system; High blood pressure; Hyperarousal; Hypertension; Insomnia; Short sleep duration

PMID:
29779139
DOI:
10.1007/s11906-018-0850-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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