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Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2018 Aug;37(8):1539-1545. doi: 10.1007/s10096-018-3282-y. Epub 2018 May 19.

Comparison of the etiological relevance of Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus hominis.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Hospital Hygiene, Bundeswehr Hospital Hamburg, Bernhard Nocht Str. 74, 20359, Hamburg, Germany. Frickmann@bnitm.de.
2
Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology and Hygiene, University Medicine Rostock, Schillingallee 70, 18057, Rostock, Germany. Frickmann@bnitm.de.
3
Institute for Microbiology, Charité - University Medicine Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117, Berlin, Germany.
4
Institute for Medical Microbiology, Virology and Hygiene, University Medicine Rostock, Schillingallee 70, 18057, Rostock, Germany.
5
Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine Hamburg, Bernhard Nocht Str. 74, 20359, Hamburg, Germany.
6
Institute of Medical Microbiology, University Hospital Münster, Domagkstraße 10, 48149, Münster, Germany.

Abstract

The study was performed to assess potential differences in the etiological relevance of two coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus hominis, in an observational single-center study. Over a 5-year interval, patients in whom there was detected S. haemolyticus or S. hominis of presumed etiological relevance were assessed for the primary endpoint death during hospital stay and the secondary endpoint transfer to an intensive care unit (ICU) after the detection of S. haemolyticus or S. hominis. Patients with S. haemolyticus or S. hominis died in 11.3% (50 out of 444) and 9.5% (60 out of 631) of cases, respectively, and were transferred to ICU after S. haemolyticus and S. hominis detection in 8.7% (19 out of 219) and 11.7% (44 out of 377) of cases, respectively. There was no significance for species-related influence on the primary outcome parameter (P > 0.1), while ICU transfers were more likely for patients with S. hominis detections (P = 0.016). Delayed diagnosis of both CoNS species was associated with an increased probability of death (P = 0.009). The study revealed comparable morbidity caused by S. haemolyticus and S. hominis identified in a clinically relevant context.

KEYWORDS:

Coagulase-negative staphylococci; Etiological relevance; Infection; Staphylococcus haemolyticus; Staphylococcus hominis

PMID:
29777490
DOI:
10.1007/s10096-018-3282-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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