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Exp Gerontol. 2018 Sep;110:67-72. doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2018.05.012. Epub 2018 May 26.

Mediterranean diet and depression among older individuals: The multinational MEDIS study.

Author information

1
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Universitat de Barcelona, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, Dr Antoni Pujades, 42, 08830, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Monforte de Lemos 3-5, Pabellón 11, 28029 Madrid, Spain; Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Casanova, 143, 08036 Barcelona, Spain.
2
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Universitat de Barcelona, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, Dr Antoni Pujades, 42, 08830, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Monforte de Lemos 3-5, Pabellón 11, 28029 Madrid, Spain.
3
Health Center of Areopolis, General Hospital of Sparta, Areopolis, Greece.
4
University of Malta, Nutrition, Family and Consumer Studies Office, Msida, Malta.
5
Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.
6
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
7
Health Center of Kalloni, General Hospital of Mitilini, Mitilini, Greece.
8
Research Group on Community Nutrition and Oxidative Stress, Universitat de les Illes Balears & CIBERobn, Guillem Colom Bldg, Campus, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spain.
9
Clinic of Social and Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece.
10
Department of Exercise Science and Sport Studies, School of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers University, NJ, USA.
11
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Universitat de Barcelona, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, Dr Antoni Pujades, 42, 08830, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Monforte de Lemos 3-5, Pabellón 11, 28029 Madrid, Spain; Visiting Fellow at Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, 2301 Fifth Avenue, mSuite 600, Seattle, WA 98121, USA.
12
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece. Electronic address: dbpanag@hua.gr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Depression has been linked to a large and growing economic and societal burden worldwide. In Europe, depression is one of the most frequent mental disorders across all age groups, but particularly in people aged 65 years and over, and higher depressive symptoms have been reported among individuals with chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes and heart disease).

AIM:

To evaluate the role of adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) in depression in a sample of older people living in the Mediterranean basin.

METHODS:

Standard procedures were used to determine socio-demographic, lifestyle, and clinical characteristics of the participants, as well as their dietary habits, and depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Multi-adjusted logistic and linear regression analyses were carried out to evaluate the associations between participants' characteristics and depression.

RESULTS:

Participants classified as having mild or severe depression were less educated and physically active, and more diabetic, and they reported less adherence to the MedDiet. Adherence to the MedDiet was associated with the absence of depression [(OR, 95% CI): 0.65, 0.50-0.85]. In addition, daily tea drinking was also related to the absence of depression [(OR, 95% CI): 0.51, 0.40-0.65].

CONCLUSIONS:

Greater adherence to the MedDiet and daily tea drinking seem to have a beneficial effect on depressive symptoms in older adults.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Mediterranean diet; Older adults; Tea

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