Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Br Poult Sci. 2018 Aug;59(4):435-442. doi: 10.1080/00071668.2018.1476675. Epub 2018 Jun 5.

Evaluation of bee venom as a novel feed additive in fast-growing broilers.

Author information

1
a Lab of Poultry Nutrition, Department of Animal Science and Technology , Konkuk University , Seoul , South Korea.
2
b Rural Development Administration , National Institute of Agricultural Science and Technology , Jeonju-si , South Korea.

Abstract

1. The present study was designed to evaluate purified bee venom (BV) as an alternative to antibiotics in broiler chickens. The experimental treatment diets were formulated by adding BV into a maize-soybean meal-based diet to give 0, 10, 50, 100, and 500 μg BV per kg of diet. 2. Dietary BV quadratically improved (P < 0.05) feed conversion ratio and increased body weight gain at 1-21 d as level in diet increased. Higher BV levels lowered relative weight of spleen (linear and quadratic, P < 0.05), bursa of Fabricius (quadratic, P < 0.05), and liver (linear and quadratic, P < 0.05) at 21 d of age. Relative breast meat yields were increased quadratically at 21 d and linearly at 35 d with supplementation levels. Dietary BV increased (linear and quadratic, P < 0.05) lightness (L*) value for meat at 21 d, decreased (linear, P < 0.05) ileal villus height and narrowed (quadratic, P < 0.05) width. 3. Dietary BV inclusion linearly increased the concentration of secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) on ileal mucosa at 21 d and decreased (quadratic, P < 0.05) nitric oxide contents in serum samples at 21 d and 35 d. Total short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) in caecal digesta were reduced with increasing venom in diets at 21 d of age. None of the serum parameters except for creatinine was affected by dietary BV. 4. It was concluded that dietary BV exhibited wide range of in vivo biological properties in broiler chickens and could be incorporated into feed to promote growth and animal health.

KEYWORDS:

Alternatives to antibiotics; BV; broiler chicken; growth performance; gut physiology

PMID:
29774758
DOI:
10.1080/00071668.2018.1476675
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis
Loading ...
Support Center