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Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2018 Sep;171(2):421-426. doi: 10.1007/s10549-018-4822-y. Epub 2018 May 17.

Age at first full-term birth and breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

Author information

1
Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, 76 Grenville St., 6th Floor, Toronto, ON, M5S 1B2, Canada.
2
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
3
Department of Genetics and Pathology, International Hereditary Cancer Center, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland.
4
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA.
5
Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, Toronto, ON, Canada.
6
Division of Biomarkers of Early Detection and Prevention, Department of Population Sciences, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USA.
7
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
8
London Health Sciences, London, ON, Canada.
9
City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, USA.
10
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center/Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.
11
Department of Oncology and Human Genetics, Programs in Cancer Genetics, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada.
12
Cleveland Clinic, Genomic Medicine Institute and Center for Personalized Genetic Healthcare, Cleveland, OH, USA.
13
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
14
Division of Human Genetics, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USA.
15
Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, 76 Grenville St., 6th Floor, Toronto, ON, M5S 1B2, Canada. steven.narod@wchospital.ca.
16
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. steven.narod@wchospital.ca.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In the general population, an early age at first full-term birth confers protection against the risk of developing breast cancer. The relationship between age at first birth and breast cancer risk is not clear for women with a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Thus, we undertook a case-control study of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation to study the effects of age at first full-term birth matched for other reproductive factors.

METHODS:

Information about reproductive factors, including age at first birth as well as medical history, was collected from a routinely administered research questionnaire. There were 2,295 matched pairs of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation included in the final analysis.

RESULTS:

There was no significant difference in the mean age at first full-term birth among the BRCA1 (24.9 vs. 25.2; P = 0.10) or BRCA2 mutation carriers (26.5 vs. 26.6 years; P = 0.80). Findings were similar in the analysis limited to cases who were diagnosed with breast cancer prior to age 45.

CONCLUSION:

This matched analysis of a large number of BRCA mutation carriers suggests that age at first birth has little influence on BRCA1 or BRCA2 breast cancer risk.

KEYWORDS:

Age at first birth; BRCA1; BRCA2; Breast cancer

PMID:
29774471
DOI:
10.1007/s10549-018-4822-y

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