Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2018 May 17;13(5):e0197439. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197439. eCollection 2018.

Bacterial DNA is present in the fetal intestine and overlaps with that in the placenta in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Sackler Institute, New York, New York, United States of America.
2
Department of Translational Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
4
Department of Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
5
Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
6
Division of Infectious Diseases Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
7
Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia.
8
Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.

Abstract

Bacterial DNA has been reported in the placenta and amniotic fluid by several independent groups of investigators. However, it's taxonomic overlap with fetal and maternal bacterial DNA in different sites has been poorly characterized. Here, we determined the presence of bacterial DNA in the intestines and placentas of fetal mice at gestational day 17 (n = 13). These were compared to newborn intestines (n = 15), maternal sites (mouth, n = 6; vagina, n = 6; colon, n = 7; feces, n = 8), and negative controls to rule out contamination. The V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene indicated a pattern of bacterial DNA in fetal intestine similar to placenta but with higher phylogenetic diversity than placenta or newborn intestine. Firmicutes were the most frequently assignable phylum. SourceTracker analysis suggested the placenta as the most commonly identifiable origin for fetal bacterial DNA, but also over 75% of fetal gut genera overlapped with maternal oral and vaginal taxa but not with maternal or newborn feces. These data provide evidence for the presence of bacterial DNA in the mouse fetus.

PMID:
29771989
PMCID:
PMC5957394
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0197439
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center